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This topic describes how to use the Local Group Policy Editor gpedit to manage four types of event-driven scripting files. You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer. For more information about the editor, see Local Group Policy Editor.

In the Script Name box, type the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. In the Script Parameters box, type any parameters that you want, the same way as you would type them on the command line. If you assign multiple scripts, the scripts are processed in the order that you specify.

group policy vbs logon script

To move a script up in the list, click it and then click Up. To move a script down in the list, click it and then click Down. Add : Opens the Add a Script dialog box, where you can specify any additional scripts to use. Edit : Opens the Edit Script dialog box, where you can modify script information, such as name and parameters.

Remove : Removes the selected script from the Startup Scripts list. Startup scripts are run under the Local System account, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run under the Local System account.

This is a different behavior from earlier operating systems. Enabling the Run Startup Scripts Visible policy setting will have no effect when running startup scripts asynchronously. In Script Nametype the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. In Script Parameterstype any parameters that you want, the same way as you would type them on the command line.

Remove : Removes the selected script from the Shutdown Scripts list.

group policy vbs logon script

Shutdown scripts are run as Local System, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run as Local System. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logon Scripts list.

group policy vbs logon script

Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logoff Scripts list. Skip to main content.

Working with startup, shutdown, logon, and logoff scripts using the Local Group Policy Editor

Exit focus mode. Introduction Group Policy allows you to associate one or more scripting files with four triggered events: Computer startup Computer shutdown User logon User logoff You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer.

In the results pane, double-click Startup. In the Startup Properties dialog box, click Add. In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In the Script Name box, type the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

Configuring logon PowerShell scripts with Group Policy

Setting startup scripts to run synchronously may cause the boot process to run slowly. In the results pane, double-click Shutdown. In the Shutdown Properties dialog box, click Add. In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In Script Nametype the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. Setting shutdown scripts to run synchronously may cause the shutdown process to run slowly.

In the results pane, double-click Logon. In the Logon Properties dialog box, click Add. Setting logon scripts to run synchronously may cause the logon process to run slowly.

Logon scripts are run as User, not Administrator, and their rights are limited accordingly.In this section I will give you examples of how to build the VBScript to use in your logon script.

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I will help you chose which methods to use and which variables to change. There are two sections; one section specialises in mapped network driveswhile the other section deals with scripts for printers. Please choose a Windows Logon Script to suit your particular task. When I first saw WindowsI investigated the new features. This lead me to investigate VBScript methods for providing mapped network drives and connecting to shared printers. Good news. My point is that knowledge of these scripting objects, syntax and methods will help you automate other computer tasks.

This utility will also guide you through troubleshooting; the dashboard will indicate whether the root cause is a broken link, faulty equipment or resource overload. What I like best is the way NPM suggests solutions to network problems. Its also has the ability to monitor the health of individual VMware virtual machines. If you are interested in troubleshooting, and creating network maps, then I recommend that you try NPM now.

Logon Scripts – With VBScript

VBScript to map a network drive. Here are step-by-step instructions to create this logon script. CreateObject "WScript. UserName objNetwork. WSH provides the objects, which our scripts then manipulate. Here are examples of the tasks that these objects and services can do for you:. Import users from a spreadsheet. Just provide a list of the users with their fields in the top row, and save as.

Optionally, you can provide the name of the OU where the new accounts will be born. Download your FREE bulk import tool. When a logon script arrives from the dedicated server ,WSH makes sure that all the objects and services that the script needs are available.

group policy vbs logon script

It alsochecks discretely for security and passes the script to the appropriate script engine, for example, ActiveX.I want the logon script to delete the drives when the logon script is first run so in case there is a change it matches the new settings. You can do what you ask with 0 scripting. The hiding of the drive share path will be problematic, since that is a function of windows that I'm not aware can be changed. Hi, I normally do the scripting exactly the way you are suggesting but unfortunately my client is looking to have the network drives hidden.

As I see it you need a way to manage the list of 50 shares and how to centrally manage who get what network share. I have to be careful on what self authored scripts I post because of my contact with my employer, but I might look at setting up the script similar to this: understand this hasn't been debugged or much thought put into it, I just glued the two referenced scripts together.

I want to hide the server the share is on. If it is more easily done with GPP where would I go to do it with a GPP forgive my asking to be spoonfed here, I've got 0 experience in scripting, it's out of my comfort zone.

Have you googled "access based enumeration"? It night be a better fit for the customers actual need? This means that the users don't see the server the actual shares are on. The name of the actual file share is abstracted and subject to change at any time. Changes in the DFS Namespace targets to not affect drive mappings, shortcuts, or document links because the UNC path always stays the same.

The vbscript interpreter will tell you where there are errors. When you are starting out Google is your friend to try to find vbscript examples and fixing errors. This script is pretty simple with a few advanced fixes. Just keep working through the errors one by one to achieve success. Remember I said the script wasn't debugged. BTW: I understand why you are going this route.

I don't know why the client wants this, but it appears to be possible. It contains the solution you're looking for. A cleaner way to do this would be to use DFS-Namespace to do this.

Assign Logon Script via Group Policy

This will hide the server and share from My Computer and the command line Net Use, but you can still look at the properties of the share where the DFS tab will show the list of host computers. Final note, if you're looking to do this for security, don't bother. Obscuring the host server's name won't make it anymore secure. Let me intrude late in the game, this is a script I've used and abused through many a migration and new domain configs.

It allows you to map multiple drives based on AD group membership, without the pitfalls of using a case statement.This topic describes how to install and use scripts on a domain controller. If you want information about script use for the local computer, see Working with startup, shutdown, logon, and logoff scripts using the Local Group Policy Editor.

You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer. You must be a member of the Domain Administrators security group to configure scripts on a domain controller. Right-click the Group Policy Object you want to edit, and then click Edit. In Script Nametype the path of the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

In Script Parameterstype any parameters that you want, exactly as you would type them on the command line. If you assign multiple scripts, the scripts are processed in the order that you specify. To move a script up in the list, click it, and then click Up. To move a script down in the list, click it, and then click Down.

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Add : Opens the Add a Script dialog box, where you can specify any additional scripts to use. Edit : Opens the Edit Script dialog box, where you can change script information, such as name and parameters.

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Remove : Removes the selected script from the Startup Scripts list. Startup scripts are run under the Local System account, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run under the Local System account. Startup scripts that run asynchronously will not be visible. Enabling the Run Startup Scripts Visible Group Policy setting has no effect when you are running startup scripts asynchronously.

Open the Group Policy Management Console. Right-click the Group Policy object you want to edit, and then click Edit. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Shutdown Scripts list. Shutdown scripts are run as Local System, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run as Local System. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logon Scripts list. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logoff Scripts list. Skip to main content. Exit focus mode.

Group Policy allows you to associate one or more scripting files to four triggered events: Computer startup Computer shutdown User logon User logoff You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer. How to set up scripts on the domain controller To set up scripts on the domain controller Copy the script and dependent files to the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

Additional considerations You must be a member of the Domain Administrators security group to configure scripts on a domain controller. In the results pane, double-click Startup.

In the Startup Properties dialog box, click Add. In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In Script Nametype the path of the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.The crucial advantage of employing the Group Policy method is when you have to change the script name or add a new logon script.

I assume that you have created the logon script and tested that it meets your goals of Mapping Network Drives or Printers. My tip is to copy the VBScript file name into memory, I will explain how to paste it into the appropriate box. This method also assumes you have an Active Directory domain. As a matter of tactics, will this be a logon script for all users, or for just one OU?

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Always check that you are starting from the correct place in Active Directory Users and Computers. Only you know if you should be at the Domain level, or the OU level. To find the logon script settings start by clicking Edit, then navigate to the User Configuration, expand the Windows Settings folder, Scripts and Logon.

Now for my secret ingredient; my top tip is to copy your logon script into memory, so that it is ready to paste. Now for the crucial part, right-click and Paste. If this does not work, then double click in the big white box under, Look i n: Logon. Your script should now appear in the window. My point is that by assigning the script using this technique the VBScript ends up in the correct folder. If you examine that long path seen from the Look in: dialog box you should see your VBScript.

If you simply add a script using a local path, I doubt that your VBScript will be replicated to other domain controllers. Observe the Polices folder structure on the domain controller. Sometimes you see two sysvol folders. Under the second sysvol you will see your domain name, and further down the actual group policies. Each policy has sub menus with its templates and scripts. Concentrate on the folders called Scripts. Earlier I said observe because I do not want you to rename the group policies with Windows Explorer.

If you change those strange hex names, the policies will not work and the new names will give you nothing but grief. This utility will also guide you through troubleshooting; the dashboard will indicate whether the root cause is a broken link, faulty equipment or resource overload. What I like best is the way NPM suggests solutions to network problems.

70 411 - Chapter 5 Lesson 1 - Applying Startup - Shutdown Scripts through GPO Server 2012

Its also has the ability to monitor the health of individual VMware virtual machines. If you are interested in troubleshooting, and creating network maps, then I recommend that you try NPM now. Part of me is sad that there is no real coding, part of me accepts that this an easier way of assigning mapped network drives.

Logon to a domain controller and launch the Group Policy Management Console. Assign your mapped logon drives using the built-in drop-down boxes. See more on Group Policy Preferences. Import users from a spreadsheet. Just provide a list of the users with their fields in the top row, and save as. Optionally, you can provide the name of the OU where the new accounts will be born.Even though I am going to show you how to set up a Group Policy to run a PowerShell script, I encourage you to think about what you really need to accomplish.

Many people still use logon scripts, for example, to do things that can now be done as a Group Policy preference such as mapped drives and printers. But if you think you do, the only things you should do in the script are those things for which there is no Group Policy setting. In other words, the exceptions.

Now before you get to excited realize that your clients must be running at least Windows 7 or Windows Server R2. Remember that logon scripts run under the credential of the current user and it only makes sense that your logon script perform tasks specific to the user. Computer scripts should run under the system context which should give you more leeway.

One area you might need to test is if your computer script, e. Credentials may be an issue. I also encourage you to test your scripts interactively first to verify it works. Because the script runs in the background and invisible to the user, I also suggest testing your script as a background job. If it runs as a background job the odds are it will run as a Group Policy script.

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Finally, I want to point out that Group Policy scripts will always run, regardless of your local script execution policy. Even if your execution policy is restricted Group Policy scripts will still run using a Bypass policy. The assumption is that if you have setup a Group Policy to run a script, you know what the script will do and are taking adequate steps to protect it.

In the screenshot below you can see I have the Group Policy Management console open. Double-Click on the type of script you want to create. Because it is possible you may have other types of scripts to run as well, you can control when PowerShell scripts are run in the drop down box as seen below.

Now I need to add a script. Open another window with your script folder. Then simply drag and drop the file or files to the GPO as I do in the next screenshot. The files in the Logon folder will replicate and should be pretty secure.

Once the file is copied I can go back to the Logon Properties dialog and click the Add button. I find it easiest to browse.Technical Library Support. Configure the Windows logon scripts to run.

You can configure your logon script to run with a group policy on Active Directory or Note that earlier versions of Active Directory have not been certified with this Websense Web Security version. The following procedures are specific to Microsoft operating systems and are provided here as a courtesy. Websense, Inc. For more information, see the links provided. Before beginning, make sure your environment meets the conditions described in Prerequisites for running the Windows logon script.

In the Logon Properties window, click Show Files. Copy two files into this folder: your logon script for example, Logon. In the Logon Properties window, click Add.

Click Browse to open the logon script directory, then select your logon script file and click OK. Verify that the logon script now appears in the list on the Logon Properties window, then click OK.

Optional If you are also using a logoff script, repeat steps 5 through 9. This time, double-click Logoff at Step 5 and copy your logoff batch file into the folder that opens. Repeat this procedure on each domain controller in your network, as needed. Copyright Forcepoint LLC. All rights reserved. Open the Group Policy Management console:.


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Group policy vbs logon script
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